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Making Perfect Gravy

Sometimes you may be ready to go regarding making a roast and mashed potatoes—you may know exactly what to do when you are faced with a raw chunk of meat and some raw potatoes. But gravy, on the other hand, can be quite daunting. Yet, when it comes time to make the gravy it may seem to be the task that everyone wants to push onto someone else. If you find making the gravy hard to make (without a mix), then this article is for you.

Making gravy really isn't that hard. When the meat is done cooking, take the roast out of the pot and put it somewhere else to keep it warm. Usually the oven that is still warm makes a great place to keep your roast warm. When you take the roast out of the pot, however, do not under any circumstances pour the drippings out or throw them away. The drippings are the key to the gravy they are what make the gravy even possible.

Add one cup of water to the dripping and then put the drippings in a skillet or frying pan and bring them to a boil, stirring them around a bit. When the drippings are coming to a boil, mix one cup of water and one tablespoon of flour together in a jar. (It's best to put the water and flour in a jar with a lid and shake it around to thoroughly mix it.) Once the drippings are boiling, gradually add the flour and water mixture to the drippings, stirring constantly. (It's best to use a whisk.) Add some salt and pepper to taste.

If you want to make the gravy thicker, mix up another mixture of water and flour, but this time just not as much—you don't want your gravy to be too thick either. Once your gravy is finished, put it into a gravy boat or other serving dish and pour generously over your roast and mashed potatoes! Here's to the perfect dinner gravy!

 

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Comments for this tip:

Bryan    16 May 2013, 16:18
If you want flavor, why not use a flavored liquid like beef/chicken stock? This can also be done with milk to make a white gravy. Water (even potato water) is just a waste of volume.
Brenda    15 May 2013, 09:36
Instead of tap water, I use about half a cup of the water from the boiling potatoes and half a cup of cold water. The starch in the potato water adds more flavor and is a natural thickener. Make sure to cook the gravy at least 10 minutes to get rid of the raw flour taste.
 
 

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