Loading
Cooking.Tips.Net Cooking Tips

Working with Meat

Not sure how to handle the meat you're working with? Read through these tips to figure out your next cooking project.

Never use the same plate to carry cooked food back that you had raw meat on. If you do, your chicken could become contaminated with bacteria from the raw meat. The same goes for your utensils. Use clean plates and utensils after you remove cooked foods from the heat, and wash your hands often while you're working with raw meats.

If you're marinating meat that will be cooked in a couple of hours, don't leave it out on the counter! Always put marinating meat in the refrigerator to keep bacteria from multiplying. Also, never reuse marinade after it's been on raw meat or fish or you risk cross contamination of your food.

Does your roast or chicken stick to the pan you're cooking it in? Stop your meats from sticking by adding a few stalks of fresh celery to the dish before putting it in the oven. The celery will lend a bit of flavor and make cleaning up a breeze.

After you brush your meat with a sauce, you're ready to truss it. Why isn't there ever clean string to use when you need it? Grab some dental floss instead. Dental floss is the best material to use for trussing up meat to be grilled or roasted. It's strong enough to do the job, and it won't burn during the cooking process. Plus, it comes in a handy little dispenser. What more could you ask for? (Make sure you buy a non-flavored variety—you probably don't want the added cinnamon or mint with your meal.)

Do you find that inexpensive stew meat or stewing steak becomes tough after you cook it? Try one of these tips to keep the meat tender.

  • Add a tablespoon of vinegar to the water while boiling your stew meat. Vinegar will tenderize even the toughest meat so that you can cut it with a fork.
  • Cut a kiwi into small pieces and add it to your stew. That little green fruit contains an enzyme called actinidin, which breaks down the tough meat, and kiwi gives an interesting flavor to your recipe.

Be very careful with any meat recipe that calls for pineapple. There is an enzyme in fresh pineapple that will make your meat fall apart if it's on too long—canned pineapple doesn't generally contain the enzyme. Your meal will be most stable if you add the pineapple just before serving.

If you like to make your own gravy, soups, or broths but hate the slow process of separating the fat from the meat juice, simply strain it through a paper coffee filter. You'll be left with natural, flavorful, fat-free broth.

 

Leave your own comment:

*Name:
Email:
  Notify me about new comments ONLY FOR THIS TIP
Notify me about new comments ANYWHERE ON THIS SITE
Hide my email address
*Text:
*What is 5+3 (To prevent automated submissions and spam.)
 
 
           Commenting Terms

Comments for this tip:

jenia    10 Jul 2013, 10:45
my comment is the fact that ther was alot of interesting facts about meat.Expecilly abuot the kiwi and pinappl. :)
 
 

Our Company

Sharon Parq Associates, Inc.

About Tips.Net

Contact Us

 

Advertise with Us

Our Privacy Policy

Our Sites

Tips.Net

Beauty and Style

Cars

Cleaning

Cooking

DriveTips (Google Drive)

ExcelTips (Excel 97–2003)

ExcelTips (Excel 2007–2016)

Gardening

Health

Home Improvement

Money and Finances

Organizing

Pests and Bugs

Pets and Animals

WindowsTips (Microsoft Windows)

WordTips (Word 97–2003)

WordTips (Word 2007–2016)

Our Products

Helpful E-books

Newsletter Archives

 

Excel Products

Word Products

Our Authors

Author Index

Write for Tips.Net

Copyright © 2017 Sharon Parq Associates, Inc.