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Bordeaux Wine

There are only a few wines authorized to be used in the red wines section of the Bordeaux region of France. The wines that we know as Bordeaux wines come from that region, and are a blended variety of red wines. There are six varieties of Bordeaux wine, and they are Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot, Malbec, and Carmenere.

Varietal wines are those that are named for the grape variety from which they are made. Bordeaux wines are excellent quality wines and are, in most cases, the best wines produced by a winery. But since there is not enough of one type of grape variety to permit a wine to have a Varietal label, regulations concerning wine labels can only classify Bordeaux blends as red table wine. Therefore, a winery must be able to show the consumer why his bottle of red table wine is different from a generic red table wine, allowing him to charge over fifty dollars per bottle, rather than ten. Very few Bordeaux blends use all six of the permitted grape varieties. Instead, the blends are comprised of three or four of the varieties, with either Merlot, Cabernet, or Sauvignon used as the primary grape.

Cooking with wine can add an entire new flavor to foods. The main incentive for adding wine to the cooking process is to enhance the textures of the foods, while simultaneously boosting flavor. When cooking with wine, here are some things to consider:

  • Not all of the wine will evaporate while cooking. The shorter the cooking time, the more concentrated the alcohol residue.
  • Experiment using different Bordeaux wines in simple sauces. Use small amounts, making notes about taste and texture as you go along.
  • Don't use cheap cooking wines since they tend to be briny and contain additional spices that will not enhance your food.
  • Use Bordeaux wines as a spice when cooking. The longer you allow food to simmer with spice, the more the more takes on the flavor. The same holds true for wine. Allow the food to steep in the wine for at least forty-five minutes, if the recipe allows.

Finally, remember that Bordeaux wines usually bring color and a discerning dry attribute to any foods they flavor. Use Bordeaux wines to flavor sauces and serve with red meats. They also lend themselves well to pasta dishes with meat sauce.

 

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