Green Coffee

by Lee Wyatt
(last updated September 26, 2016)

Coffee is one of the most popular beverages in the world, and as such is such a highly traded commodity. In fact, there is only one commodity that is traded more often: oil. Considering how popular this product is around the world, it only stands to reason that there has to be an environmentally friendly manner to produce this favored beverage. That method would be through the use of green coffee.

  • What is it? You may be asking yourself the rather simple question of what is green coffee? Well the answer to that is also rather simple: Green coffee is the unroasted and relatively unprocessed coffee bean. By purchasing the bean in this state you are reducing the amount of carbon and other pollutants that are released into the air. Other aspects that play into making a coffee green is whether it is organic and if it is part of fair trade agreements.
  • Where to get it. Surprisingly, you can purchase green coffee just about everywhere. You can typically purchase gourmet green coffee beans (ground and whole bean) from your local Starbucks or similar coffee house. Some coffee houses are now even beginning to do their own in-house roasting, which helps the reduction of industrialized by-products being produced. Alternatively, you can also purchase green coffee from local organic grocery stores, online, and increasingly at local grocery stores.
  • Home roasting. Roasting your own coffee beans only adds an additional ten minutes to your coffee-making routine and will help ensure the freshest tasting coffee possible. Besides the environmentally friendly benefits associated with home roasting, there is the side benefit that you will be able to produce exactly the type of coffee that you wish; mild, bold, dark, or regular; it's up to you.
  • Making it. Through the use of home roasters, grinders, and reusable filters you can make a great brew at home. One of the best methods available to make some great green coffee at home is through the use of a French press coffee maker, which uses no external filtration system and can be reused indefinitely.

Author Bio

Lee Wyatt

Contributor of numerous Tips.Net articles, Lee Wyatt is quickly becoming a regular "Jack of all trades." He is currently an independent contractor specializing in writing and editing. Contact him today for all of your writing and editing needs! Click here to contact. ...

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