Matzo Ball Soup

by Lee Wyatt
(last updated January 7, 2015)

Matzo ball soup is an easily made, traditional dish that is served at many a table during the Seder feast. The reason for this is that it combines two separate elements that have long been a traditional favorite of the Seder feast—matzo balls and vegetable soup. While this soup is extremely easy to make, it is a little time consuming. All told, the soup will take about 2 1/2 hours to make from scratch. No worries though, it is definitely worth it.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups matzo meal
  • 9 eggs
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil (make sure it is kosher for Passover)
  • Salt and pepper to taste (for matzo balls)
  • 1 tablespoon salt (for broth)
  • 3 carrots cut into chunks
  • 2 medium onions cut into chunks
  • 3 turnips cut into chunks
  • 2 parsnips cut into chunks
  • 12 cloves of garlic
  • 1 thinly sliced leek
  • 3/4 teaspoon turmeric
  • Handful of parsley and dill
  • Enough water to fill a large stock pot 3/4 of the way

Directions:

  1. Make matzo dough. In a large mixing bowl, mix together the matzo meal, eggs, oil, and salt and pepper until everything has been evenly distributed. You will know that the raw dough is ready when there are no lumps left.
  2. Let matzo set. Once you have mixed the raw dough until there are no lumps left, cover the bowl with some waxed paper. Set the covered bowl into your refrigerator and allow it to set for 30 minutes.
  3. Prepare broth. While your matzo dough is setting in the fridge, begin working on your broth. Fill a large stock pot 3/4 of the way full with warm water, and then begin adding all the remaining ingredients. Bring your mixture to a boil, and then reduce the heat to a slow simmer. Cover the stock pot, and allow the broth to simmer for about 2 hours. Check every hour, and adjust the taste as necessary by adding salt or pepper.
  4. Make matzo balls. About 10 minutes before you pull your matzo dough out of the refrigerator, put a large pot of water onto the stove, and bring it to a boil. While the water is heating up, begin making your matzo balls. Pull enough dough out so that you can roll it into a ball roughly the size of a golf ball. Cover your hands in some kosher-for-Passover vegetable oil to prevent the dough from sticking to your hands. Carefully drop the matzo balls into the boiling water to begin cooking them.
  5. Cook matzo balls. Allow the matzo balls to cook for about 20 minutes, or until they are done. You will know they are done when they begin floating on the top of the water. The matzo balls will at first sink to the bottom of the pot, and then rise back to the top as they cook. Remove the balls from the water, and slice one in half to check to see if it is finished. The center should have a grainy and yellow look. Set aside the finished matzo balls into a bowl of cold water in the refrigerator until the broth is finished.
  6. Add matzo balls to broth. After you have cooked the broth for two hours, remove it from the heat, and strain out all the vegetables. Discard the vegetables, and replace the broth onto the stove. Carefully place the matzo balls into the broth. Allow the matzo balls and broth to heat back up before serving
  7. Dish the soup into a bowl that is large enough to hold the broth and several matzo balls. Serve the soup while it is still hot. This recipe will produce between four and six servings, depending on how much you put into each bowl. If more is needed, simply double the ingredients to give you twice as much soup and matzo balls.

Author Bio

Lee Wyatt

Contributor of numerous Tips.Net articles, Lee Wyatt is quickly becoming a regular "Jack of all trades." He is currently an independent contractor specializing in writing and editing. Contact him today for all of your writing and editing needs! Click here to contact. ...

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