Roasting Meat Correctly

by Lee Wyatt
(last updated August 2, 2010)

Have you ever noticed how difficult it can be to roast meat correctly? First of all, there are so many different kinds, and cuts, of meat out there that it can be fairly difficult to figure out the correct cooking time on your own. The second reason roasting meat correctly can be a little difficult is because you need to have the proper tools. In this case, there is one tool that you must absolutely have if you wish to have some properly roasted meat—the cooking thermometer. With a working cooking thermometer, and this easy set of guidelines, you should have no problem being able to get the type of roasted meat that you want.

  • Beef Rib Roast. To get an 8 pound standing beef rib roast done properly, first, set your oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit. For a rare roast, allow the meat to cook for at least 2-1/2 hours, or until the internal temperature is 140 degrees Fahrenheit. For medium roasts, the time is 3 hours, and the internal temperature is 160 degrees Fahrenheit; while it will take 4-1/2 hours and an internal temperature of 170 degrees for your roast to be well done.
  • Sirloin Tip. 3 pounds of sirloin tip will need to be roasted in an oven at 325 degrees Fahrenheit for 1-1/2 hours to reach 140 degrees Fahrenheit to be considered rare. Medium will require an internal temperature of 160 degrees Fahrenheit and a cooking time of 2 hours, and well done will require 2-1/4 hours to reach 170 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Leg of Lamb. Leg of lamb should never be served rare, and as such 6 pounds will require 3 hours roasting at 325 degrees Fahrenheit to achieve an internal temperature of 175 degrees Fahrenheit and be cooked to medium. To get your leg of lamb well done, you will need to cook it for 3-1/2 hours to achieve an internal temperature of 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Turkey (unstuffed). When roasting a turkey, make sure that you cook it thoroughly, unless you want to possibly get sick. Do not eat your turkey until it has reached an internal temperature of at least 180 degrees Fahrenheit. If you roast a 20 pound turkey in a 325 degree Fahrenheit oven, it will take you about 4-1/2 hours to reach that safe temperature.
  • Chicken (unstuffed). Roast an unstuffed, 8 pound chicken in an oven for about 5 hours to reach an internal temperature of 180 degrees Fahrenheit. Make sure that you have the oven set at 325 degrees Fahrenheit though.
  • Duck (unstuffed). A 5 pound, unstuffed, duck for 3 hours at 325 degrees Fahrenheit to achieve an internal temperature of 180 degrees.

Author Bio

Lee Wyatt

Contributor of numerous Tips.Net articles, Lee Wyatt is quickly becoming a regular "Jack of all trades." He is currently an independent contractor specializing in writing and editing. Contact him today for all of your writing and editing needs! Click here to contact. ...

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